industrial revolution
Home & Timeline Search Revision Teachers casahistoria
 

Use this page
 to help you find sites on the web
 about the industrial revolution
 


 
 
   



1. The Reasons for the Industrial Revolution
2. The Textile industry
3. Factory conditions
4. Life in the new industrial Towns
5. Documents
6. General Sites on the Industrial Rev

   
Coalbrookdale at night by Philipp Jakob Loutherbourg d. J. 1740–1812. Click for full picture 

 





  Click here to be taken to the slavery site


  I'm useful but a little more difficult!!
   Means a more useful but also more difficult site to use.




A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms. 

 

 
go back to top
 
   
 
 

1. The Reasons for the Industrial Revolution

 

a) Population Growth:

 


b) Agricultural Revolution to feed the growing population:

 

I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Agricultural Revolution in England 1500 - 1850 Detailed and thorough BBC site. From the 16th century onwards, an essentially organic agriculture was gradually replaced by a farming system that depended on technology.    
I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Biographies from the BBC of :
Jethro Tull
Robert Bakewell
 
 



c) Inventions to clothe the growing population:

 


d) Raw Materials to produce and fuel the new inventions:



    Coal:

Queen Coal? Why should we remember Victorian mining women? Interesting set of pages from National Coal Mining Museum for England. (MLA site). Good descriptions, images, documents.

 

     Iron:



e) Transport to get raw materials & products to the customers:        
f) Money to pay for the machines, raw materials and factories:

I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Slave-related trade & Profit margins Two articles from the BBC's Abolition of the Slave Trade site that show how the Slave trade helped to provide the money to pay for Britain's early industrialisation as well as its first key overseas markets.
                          



g) Enterprising individuals to take advantage of the changes:
  • Textile Entrepreneurs. List of the early entrepeneurs from Spartacus. Including
  • Who Wants to Be a Cotton Millionaire? History Simulation game from the  BBC. You have to plan a cotton factory to make as much money as possible! As you play, your stacks of money will rise and fall, depending on the choices you make, and you'll find out if you can make it as a Victorian entrepreneur. Choose well, make money and the business will survive. Choose badly, and the businessman could end up in debtors' prison.
  • Wedgwood Plate Find out what links Wedgwood to Charles Darwin. BBC site.

 

h) General

 

I'm useful but a little more difficult!! Pre-conditions of the Industrial Revolution Clearly set out listing of factors from the Victorian Web. Good place to start. See also the well detailed Chronology.
                        
I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  The Workshop of the World The Industrial revolution promoted the world's first industrial and consumer-oriented society in Britain. Pat Hudson looks at the forces that made Britain the workshop of the world and explains why this industrial dominance lasted such a short time. 
  • Was there an Industrial Revolution? Looks briefly at what really did start the revolution, or if it was not even a sudden change at all. Excellent key points from BBC bitesize site
 
 
 
 
 
A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms. 
 
 
 
 
 
go back to top
 
   
 
 

 

2. The Textile industry

     

Cottage Industry

 

The inventions

  • The Textile Inventors. Bios of the inventors from Spartacus. Including:

  • Spinning Mill This animation shows a spinning mill like that found at Quarry Bank museum in Cheshire. It shows a furnace powering a flywheel, which is there to smooth out the otherwise jerky rotation of the crank.

  • Fibers This is a brief online guide to the Industrial Revolution's Textile Industry. Useful because it is to the point and has links to other information sites (some of which are more detailed). Thanks to 6th grade Social Studies pupils at Green Mountain Christian School in Vermont for suggesting this

 

Local examples:

 

 

 
A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms. 
                        
 
 
 
 
go back to top
 
   
 
 

 

3. Factory conditions

 

I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Conditions on the Mill Interesting in that it is part of the BBC Nation on Film site. Presents good information, images, links and connections about the dangers of factories and poor working conditions. At bottom of page has links to later (after 1900) film extracts that can be downloaded.

 
 




 
A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms. 
 
 
go back to top
 
   
 
 

 

4. Life in the new industrial Towns

 

Factory town. Click for fuller picture.
  • Life in Industrial Towns Basic outlines as a starter from Open Door SiteUse these detailed Spartacus pages for descriptions, images and source support on:
  • The Workhouse The Workhouse often conjures up the grim world of Oliver Twist, but its story is a fascinating mix of social history, politics, economics and architecture. This site is dedicated to the workhouse — its buildings, inmates, staff and administrators, even its poets...
  • Muck and Brass In this game you have to help iron out some of these extremes and improve the image of "Cottonopolis". To succeed you will have to think and act like a Victorian. The results of your decisions will be measured in a macabre combination of coffins and coins. Your unenviable task is to keep the city's coffers full whilst trying to save as many of your citizens as possible from an early grave. The choices are tough and the dilemmas real. How ready is your conscience for the realities of Victorian Britain? Play 'Muck and Brass' to find out.

 

I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Population Growth in a 19th century City Well illustrated and detailed, but difficult in places.
                        
I'm useful but a little more difficult!! 

Working Life and the First Modern Census Detailed BBC essay which uses the census of 1801 and 1901 to show that Britain's working practices changed dramatically during the 19th century, and that the changes varied greatly throughout the land. 

                        
I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  London's 'Great Stink' and Victorian Urban Planning Cholera epidemics, the 'Great Stink' and miasmas combined to create a death rate in Britain's cities higher than at any time since the Black Death. This lengthy BBC site shows how the Government was forced to face up to the need to improve conditions.
                        
I'm useful but a little more difficult!!  Saltaire: A successful industrial township The Industrial Revolution and its social consequences. Looks in detail at the working of Titus salt's factory town. BBC site with good pictures and links to other sites.
                        







                       

A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms. 
 
 
 
go back to top
 
   
 
 

 

5. Documents

  • Diagrams of machines from a series called 'Illustrations of Natural Philosophy' drawn and engraved by John Emslie. This hand-coloured engraved plate is taken from a series published and probably written by James Reynolds of 174 Strand in London in 1850-1860 in response to the popular demand for information on the developments taking place in science and engineering as a result of the Industrial Revolution. Click for full picture from Ingenious.Modern History Sourcebook Excellent collection of resources and links related to the Industrial Revolution.  Covers the Revolution, the social & political effects and the literary response.
  • Ingenious: Images of the Industrial Revolution. Excellent on line museum of original pictures & objects. You can enter in any other search term you want to narrow down the selection.

 

 

 

 

 

6. General

I'm useful but a little more difficult!! All Change in the Victorian Age If you were born in the early nineteenth century, you were in for a big surprise: by 1900, the world you had grown up in was gone for good. How had the Victorians' world changed? 
   





      A flying shuttle designed for use on the fly shuttle loom, introduced by John Kay (1704- c 1780) in 1733. It has iron-tipped ends, rollers underneath to reduce friction, and two pins to weave a two ply thread. The importance of this type of shuttle was that it speeded up the weaving process (the shuttle no longer having to be laboriously passed by hand across the loom) and made possible the weaving of broader cloth - previously the width of the cloth had been restricted by the span of the weaver's arms.
 
 
 
 
go back to top
 
   
Who & what's in young casahistoria 
          
   
 
best for ages 11-14  

 

Norman England
Castles
Life in the Middle Ages
Black Death
Tudors
Stuarts
Industrial Revolution
 
  
 
best for ages 14+  

Slavery
World War 1
 
   
 
 
+ these detailed casahistoria sites:

  

Ireland, 1500- present
   English Civil War
   Russian Revolution 
   Mussolini 
   Hitler 
   Stalin 
Cold War
Mao Tse-Tung 
   Cuban Missile Crisis 
   Vietnam War 
  Middle East
 
 
 
 
Revision pages 

IGCSE & GCSE Revision 
 IB, A level & K12 Revision 
 
  
 
Using the web effectively

Students guide to using the web
 
Teachers pages   


                  
   
   

Loading
 
     
Search casahistoria for more!











             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       who we are         contact casahistoria   site map                  image use      

 
 
 v10.11    Last updated on 22-Apr-2013            LFE